Copper


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Beyond Face Value: The True Cost of Ticket Pricing

Issue 186Featured

Not so long ago, businesses lived and died by the price tag, that sticker affixed to an item served as a contract between the customer and purveyor. But what if...

CTI Records, Part Six: The Keys to CTI

Issue 186Featured

Keys – keyboards, and their players – play a big part in CTI’s many recordings, both as sidemen and as musicians featured on their own CTI or Kudu albums. Here,...

Confessions of a Tube Collector, Part Two

Issue 186Featured

In Part One of this series (Issue 183), I discussed the history of the of the vacuum tube. Since it all started with the development of the diode, we might...

Remembering Producer Phil Ramone, 10 Years Later

Issue 185Featured

The 10th anniversary of the passing of Phil Ramone at the age of 79 is upon us. A giant of the music industry, he was at the helm for a...

Eccentric Records (and How to Fix Them)

Issue 185Featured

We are talking here about physical, not psychological or emotional, eccentricity (that could be a whole ‘nother article). In Issue 184, fellow writer (and parts fabricator extraordinaire) J.I. Agnew wrote...

Last of the Free Birds

Issue 184Featured

Lynyrd Skynyrd began in 1960s Jacksonville, Florida. For those unfamiliar with Florida, Jacksonville is about 20 miles from the Georgia border, a few hours’ drive from Alabama, and a quick...

Confessions of a Tube Collector, Part One

Issue 183Featured

The vacuum tube (or thermionic valve in British usage) is probably the greatest invention of the 20th century. It heralded the beginning of the information age, an event as significant...

Desert Island Discs? Pfft! Here’s a Real Challenge

Issue 183Featured

I have to think that most our readers are familiar with the concept of “Desert Island Discs.” The premise is to make a list of albums (usually 10) that one...

Don Leslie’s Whirling Dervish Speaker Contraption

Issue 182Featured

There are a few gentlemen in particular who deserve strong recognition for the development and evolution of several modern-day musical instruments. Included in this distinguished group of instrument makers are...

CTI Records Part 4: Sax (and Violins)

Issue 182Featured

Like any jazz record label, CTI Records was no stranger to saxophone players. The label had its share of talent, from established names such as Stanley Turrentine and Paul Desmond...

Ulrike Schwarz, Jim Anderson, and Their New Par...

Issue 182Featured

Soprano saxophonist/composer Jane Ira Bloom’s Picturing the Invisible: Focus 1 recently garnered a Grammy nomination for Best Immersive Audio Album. Produced and engineered by multiple Grammy winners/nominees Ulrike Schwarz and...

Clickbait Articles Belie Reality: The Vinyl Man...

Issue 182Featured

New trade advocacy group, the Vinyl Record Manufacturers Association, is establishing best practices and standards Two recent online articles ushered in the new year with headlines that the vinyl boom...

Lounging with In-Ear Monitors, Part Three

Issue 182Featured

In our previous two articles (Issue 180 and Issue 181) we have briefly considered some of the factors which may affect the sound quality of in-ear monitors, aka IEMs, in-ear...

Lounging with in Ear Monitors, Part Two

Issue 181Featured

There are so many in-ear monitors (otherwise known as IEMs, earbuds, earphones, or in-ear headphones) in the marketplace, how can one navigate the minefield of IEMs which are out there?...

My Favorite Yes Album: Drama

Issue 181Featured

When I bought Drama (1980), my first Yes record, I wasn’t aware that it marked an end of era as Jon Anderson, the iconic voice of Yes, and Rick Wakeman...

Home Entertainment Formats Over the Past 50 Yea...

Issue 180Featured

Technological advances in the 1970s brought unprecedented conveniences for consumer home entertainment that continues a half century later in the digital age. Further examination of the machinations that ultimately gave...

Dig This: Philadelphia’s Vibrant Vinyl Scene

Issue 180Featured

I spent a lot of time in Philadelphia when I was a graduate student at Rutgers University. It was an easy trip from New Brunswick, New Jersey to central Philly...

Exploring CTI Records, Part 2: The Subsidiaries

Issue 180Featured

CTI Records had been an independent label for only a year when Creed Taylor began creating subsidiary labels. While a couple of these subsidiaries were very limited, the Kudu label...

Tim Riley’s Best Albums of 2022

Issue 179Featured

Country-pop surges, even as Shania Twain and Margo Price stare January down. And as beleaguered as culture feels for the Next Great Consensus, the variety feathering so many different year-end...

The Life and Times of a Sony Audio Engineer: Ta...

Issue 179Featured

I first had the pleasure of becoming recently acquainted with Aston Sharman, when I stumbled upon his intriguing boutique, Vintage Technology Workshop, tucked away in the UK’s historic Barbican area...

Nearly $400 Poorer, Here Are My 2022 Black Frid...

Issue 179Featured

File under, “inside the head of a Record Store Day consumer.” Since 2014, it’s been like clockwork. Twice a year I download the Record Store Day (RSD) upcoming titles list...

Exploring CTI Records, Part One: 1969 – 1971

Issue 179Featured

At the end of the A&M 60th anniversary series in Copper (in Issue 176)I featured recordings released as a collaboration between A&M Records and Creed Taylor’s CTI imprint. This CTI...

Some Holiday Music Favorites

Issue 178Featured

I might be a bit of an outlier. I typically don’t play Christmas music all that often during the holidays, since we are bombarded with it daily from November 1...

Stuffy Shmitt: Portrait of an Artist

Issue 178Featured

In the 1990s I worked at the North Star Pub in Manhattan’s South Street Seaport, a stone’s throw from the East River and in view of the old Fulton Fish...

The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Is Not Rock and Roll

Issue 178Featured

The full telecast of the November 5, 2022 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame (RRHoF) induction ceremony is now available on HBO – all four hours of it. Although I...

London’s Klooks Kleek: A Sixties Music Breeding...

Issue 177Featured

1960s British music aficionados are likely familiar with many of the era’s historic music venues, including London’s Marquee Club and Saville Theater. Devout Beatles’ fans are likely to include in...

A Look At Ravel’s Works for Orchestra

Issue 177Featured

One of the popular mantras in audiophilia is “garbage in, garbage out.” This is meant to say a piece of equipment is only as good as what comes before it....

A Most Dedicated Record Collector

Issue 177Featured

If someone offered you $30,000 for just one out of the 20,000-plus records in your collection, would you sell it? Not Joe Bussard. If you aren’t familiar with the name,...

The A&M Records Story, Part Nine: CTI Records

Issue 176Featured

This is a special installment in our A&M 60th Anniversary series. While it is out of chronological order with the rest, its unique circumstances allow us to hand off the...

A Visit to The University of Rhode Island Guita...

Issue 176Featured

I first heard about the University of Rhode Island Guitar Festival during our annual fall trip to Narragansett in 2021. My wife and I like to make one final visit...

A Trip to Eindhoven’s Philips Museum: Like a Ki...

Issue 176Featured

Ever since my grandmother Edna gave me a transistor radio for my birthday in 1964 just in time for Beatlemania, I was mesmerized by gadgets that emanated sound. By the...

There’s No Flop in MoPOP

Issue 175Featured

On a long-ago eighth grade school trip to New York City, my classmates and I watched a beautifully restored 35-millimeter print of Citizen Kane on the big screen. The 1941...

New Classical Recordings: Igor Levit's Tristan,...

Issue 175Featured

Igor Levit – Tristan (Sony, 2022) Emanuel Ax, Leonidas Kavakos, Yo-Yo Ma – Beethoven for Three, Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5 (Sony, 2022) 19439940142   Igor Levit, Tristan, album cover.   Even...

In Memory of Ramsey Lewis

Issue 175Featured

Three Grammy Awards. 80 albums. Five gold records. A National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master. Artistic director for the Ravinia Jazz Festival. Mentor for up-and-coming musicians through the Ravinia’s...

Retail Therapy

Issue 174Featured

I never trained as a psychologist. Instead, in my retail career I maintained an open mind, had probably more patience then than I do now, (but not that much less),...

Classical Music for a Desert Island, Part Three

Issue 174Featured

Part One and Part Two of this series on desert island classical music albums appeared in Issue 172 and Issue 173. To recap: this list reflects my taste. Yours may be entirely different....

The History of A&M Records, Part Eight: Hor...

Issue 174Featured

In 1975, A&M Records established a subsidiary jazz label called Horizon Records. John Snyder (who had previously worked with producer Creed Taylor) was the label’s creative director, and left in...

The Golden Decade for Popular Music…The 1950s?

Issue 174Featured

I belong to a music-listening group consisting of five people who get together once a month. Everyone gets a turn to be the host who provides the playlist, wine, and...

Long Live Rock

Issue 173Featured

For a while now, I have been thinking about how classic rock will look in its last stages. Artists are quickly aging, and surviving members of the great old bands...

The Best of CES Awards

Issue 173Featured

On the top floors of 30 Rockefeller Center sits the Rainbow Room. It’s a lovely restaurant and sometimes event space that offers a breathtaking view of Manhattan. It even has...

Classical Music for a Desert Island, Part Two

Issue 173Featured

Part One of this series on desert island classical music albums appeared in Issue 172. To recap: this list reflects my taste. Yours may be entirely different. In fact, it’s very...

The History of A&M Records, Part Eight: Jaz...

Issue 173Featured

Like almost every well-known record label, A&M Records also made some forays into the jazz world. Some would be more of a relaxed style of pop-jazz, while others would come...

Classical Music for a Desert Island, Part One

Issue 172Featured

Over the past few months, our esteemed editor Frank Doris has been sharing with us his personal choices for a desert island collection of rock albums (as per his list...

Take a Walk in Wonderland: Revisiting the Music...

Issue 172Featured

In previous Copper articles (Issue 168 and Issue 169), I have discussed the Musical Instrument Museum (MIM) in Phoenix, Arizona and some of my favorite exhibits. Here I would like...

What’s in a Name? MIRTAS – The Music Instrument...

Issue 172Featured

From December 2013 and for several years afterward I worked as a project manager in the UK for the Academy of Music and Sound, managing MIRTAS: the Music Instrument Retail...

Long Live Excellent Customer Service

Issue 171Featured

In my humble experience, I think it’s true to say that people like to buy from, yes, you guessed it…people. Particularly if the commodity is something that is as inspirational...

The Beacon Theatre’s Sphere Immersive Sound in ...

Issue 171Featured

The last show I had seen at the Beacon Theatre was either Lita Ford or Joe Jackson back in the 1980s, likely viewed from the only seat I could afford...

Jazz Producer Creed Taylor: In Memoriam

Issue 171Featured

August 22, 2022 marked the passing of legendary jazz producer Creed Taylor. Active in the music industry for decades, he left a lasting impression on the world of jazz. He...

Lemons Rally: Rust Belt Ramble, Part Three

Issue 171Featured

Day Three: “Steel City, Oil City, Silo City” Good morning! It’s the last day of the Rust Belt Ramble. This is the day of mixed emotions. On one hand, you’re...

The Colors of Music: Synesthetic Artist Sees an...

Issue 171Featured

In Issue 170, Melissa McCracken shared with our readership the fascinating experience of creating her artwork as a synesthetic. Here’s an excerpt from Part One of our interview: Melissa McCracken: Synesthesia is a...