Four letter words

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We often joke around PS Audio’s halls that CODE is a four-letter word—especially when there’s a bug. In fact, we use other four-letter words not appropriate for these pages to describe uncooperating code. But, as much as we tongue-in-cheek bash-software code, we also have a deep appreciation for its power as well as its pervasiveness in equipment. I can think of only a few PS products that do not have code to run at least their front panels or accept remote control commands.

As we move forward with PS Audio’s roadmap for future products, code + analog + hardware become important bedfellows in ways I would never have imagined even a few short decades ago.

Change is important, and so too is tradition.

I demonstrate a funny dichotomy when it comes to change vs. tradition. At home I treasure my routines: I get up at the same time every morning, bedtime’s rarely off either, and if breakfast choices change it’s only because we ran out of something. At work, it’s the opposite. I actively extract the new. I seek and conquer the uncomfortable and complex problems. I am uncomfortable with routine.

It is the combination of tradition plus change that brings about innovation worth owning.

If you’d like to learn more, Stereophile Magazine just published Part II of their interview with me. Editor John Atkinson digs deep in this, the second of three parts you can watch here and learn why CODE is a four-letter word.

Enjoy.