Lightning fast

Join Our Community Subscribe to Paul's Posts

At the risk of beating this poor horse to death, I thought I’d cover one more servo woofer item.

Speed.

We don’t normally associate woofers with speed. Slow and ponderous, woofers struggle to get out of their own way. But it’s not their fault. They have a heavy load to move around, the mass of their cones.

When a bass transient occurs, the speed of the woofer can make all the difference in the world.

Imagine a big bass drum and a musician’s furious whack of the mallet. That whack occurs quickly and the transient response might resemble the instantaneous abruptness of a square wave. The quickest bits of the mallet’s whack are reproduced by the midrange or midbass driver and the rest by the woofer. If the speed of one does not match the other a discontinuity occurs and we say the drum doesn’t have the snap it should.

It’s easy to see why. Woofers generally cannot reproduce square waves on their own. The quick start and stop of transients aren’t reflected in the woofer because of its great mass fighting the forces of inertia.

Enter the servo woofer with its accelerometer-based motional feedback system that compares the woofer’s movement (or lack of it) to the demands of the input signal. The mallet’s whack demands a near instant start and stop yet the driver cannot respond because it takes time to get moving. In even the best woofer systems this is a problem because they have no means of circumventing physics.

Sir Isaac Newton will not be denied!

Yet, the application of a motional feedback system means we can augment the laws of physics by applying a disproportional amount of power to compensate for inertia’s demands.

Which is why a proper servo bass system is the only woofer technology I know of that can keep pace with the demands of music.

And, since the sole purpose of our new speaker line is to honor the music, an accelerometer-based servo woofer system is a prerequisite for a full range setup.

It’s lightning fast.