Woofers and tweeters together

August 23, 2016
 by Paul McGowan

Yesterday I shared with you what a single tweeter looked like. If you'll recall, it was anything but smooth and flat.

But we don't listen to tweeters alone. Our systems use both woofers and tweeters in the hopes of reproducing flat sound.

Here's a response curve from Stereophile's review of the YG Anat professional monitor.

YG Acoustics

The blue line represents the output of the woofer, the red, the tweeter. Together they present a pretty flat response from 70Hz to 20kHz.

Note where the blue and red lines meet. This, of course, is the crossover point and, depending on how well the designer managed to pull rabbits from hats, will hopefully add together in the right places to present an even response to the listener.

You see the difficulty faced by speaker designers. There's little to be done with all the wiggles, bumps and dips of this response—and frankly, this is pretty good.

Imagine if this were an amplifier, the bottom end handled by one approach, the top end by another, the two hopefully meeting in the middle.

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114 comments on “Woofers and tweeters together”

  1. And these curves are heavily smoothed and reflect quasi-static conditions. Music is most dynamic Und based on transient signals. The rise time and the most different onset behaviour of tweeter and woofer will reveal the inconsistencies gained by vivisection of music with the help of a crossover-scalpel! 🙂

    1. Yes if you read the graph properly, you would see it’s flat within about 4db. Advent prodigy towers are said to be +/-3db, but are actually +/-5db. So this is more flat response over the frequencies shown in the graph, than Advent prodigy towers. To me, that’s “pretty flat”, not “perfect".

    2. Yes if you read the graph properly, you would see it’s flat within about 4db. Advent prodigy towers are said to be +/-3db, but are actually +/-5db. So this is more flat response over the frequencies shown in the graph, than Advent prodigy towers. To me, that’s “pretty flat”, not “perfect".

    3. Yes if you read the graph properly, you would see it’s flat within about 4db. Advent prodigy towers are said to be +/-3db, but are actually +/-5db. So this is more flat response over the frequencies shown in the graph, than Advent prodigy towers. To me, that’s “pretty flat”, not “perfect".

  2. It doesn't matter how much you've paid for your audio equipment, with today's stereo you will never get an "I am there" experience.
    I have seen very little progress in the last twenty years, so I save my money for the opera and live concerts.
    This does not mean that I do not turn on my stereo, but I know what I can expect.
    That is why I laugh at the tests of self-proclaimed audiophile journalists who tell you month after month about the milestones a new product has set.
    Stay calm and on the basis of facts - this will help you to avoid disappointments.
    Regards

    1. Reviewers writing for HIFI journals are heavily biased and primed by the (technical) information they got from the manufacturers. This information is not at all holistic but only focuses on a specific technical shortcoming that should be removed by the 'innovation'. Furthurmore I am not aware of serious ABX listening tests today as it was done between 1975 and 1983 in a few magazines. These listening tests were most time consuming and needed careful statistical evaluations based on the interview of at least six reviewers. The majority of today's audiophile journals aren't but clever 'designed' marketing tools financed by the manufacturers and distributors. A good example for the common aversion against real innovation is the laser turntable from Final and later ELP: Laser readout being a no brainer and commonly accepted by users of cd-players and solving the basic problem of needle based pick-ups never succeeded in the market. There are even pick-ups costing more than a laser turntable. Not solving the basic problems behind stereo and binaural psycho-acoustics leaves open a playground with unlimited pseudo-innovations. Our ears are that sensitive that we can hear even marginal improvement of existing most defective audio solutions. But the reference should not be an already defective reference system that can easily be surpassed.

    2. How about the interaction of the concert halls where you listen to your live music ? You think that your getting a smoother response at your seat than the speaker curves depicted in Paul's post ? I'll bet not.

      1. [@ned]
        I do not create problems, where none are to create.
        If you want to recreate a live performance how can you better it but the original?
        This has nothing to do with speaker curves or smoother response.
        You cannot better the best!
        Regards

      2. From a logical point of view you are referring to another category. The speaker has to follow exactly (!) the music signal. The concert hall is just a passive medium allowing the original music signal to spread out giving a footprint by it's specific room reflections. You should ask the technicians what they are measuring with their microphones and the smoothing algorithm behind!

    3. Main reason nearly all current systems don't deliver the “I am there” experience is because they introduce too many artifacts during playback - it requires quite a lot of fastidious attention to detail to eliminate all the disturbing distortions that prevent a believable illusion happening. But it can be done, and in fact has been done by people now and again over the years, by accident mostly - indeed, for decades. What needs to happen is that the process for achieving this standard of playback be thoroughly investigated, and made much more straightforward to be followed.

  3. Be careful bernd, you´re beginning to sound like Soundmind.
    And BTW, how do you know these "self-proclaimed audiophile journalists" write month after month the same nonsense.
    You know better, so why read this silly stuff.......? Ist doch alles Scheisse. 😀

      1. Thank you for taking my comment in a sporting spirit.
        And I feel the same about audio journalists.
        But having said that, I read reviews in audio magazines. Just for fun.

    1. Jb4, when I was interested, I did not design speaker systems, amplifiers, or wires. We don't listen to those. We don't listen to the room either. We listen to sound fields. The elements of a recording/playback system are a means to an end, to duplicate a sound field that reaches your ears. If you cannot analyze, engineer, and measure sound fields, you don't stand a snowball's chance in hell of ever achieving high fidelity. Even if the field you create is not exactly like the one heard live, it can have the same elements in different proportions, elements that fields from other types of sound systems can't create because they aren't engineered to. Those elements not only sound very different from the stuff you can buy, they add greatly to the enjoyment of recordings.

      1. I remember hearing an unusual system at a show in Montreal where a single tweeter, single midrange and a single woofer were positioned at different points on the front wall. A stereo signal was fed to the processor and the soundfield from just these three drivers created a soundstage that remained intact as you walked about the room. It was very life-like, too, and based on psychoacoustics, rather than the traditional two-channel stereo approach. Unfortunately, the inventor does not seem to have been able to acquire the funding to develop his prototype into a marketable product. It's unfortunate because it was high fidelity, yet did not dominate the room with two large speakers and a rack full of mega-buck equipment. It was a solution for people who would want quality sound, yet still be able to walk around in the room while doing other tasks. I think you would have liked it, Soundmind.

  4. Paul - I'm loving this series. Please keep it up! How will the response curve look when there are 3 drivers? Pretty flat overall, or two dips just like today's? And what problems come about in the frequencies where both drivers are pumping sound? Hopefully these are posts you've got planned out. Thank you!

  5. Can anyone here suggest a reasonably priced set-up of gear to measure frequency response in-room? This would possibly help me tune my room even finer. I'm thinking of something like a microphone interfaced with a computer program that could give me a readout on a computer screen. Hopefully something less expensive than lab-grade equipment. I've seen programs on smart phones, but how good can the microphone be in those?

    1. You can use Room EQ Wizard, which is free, and a Umik USB mic from MiniDSP, which is around $100.

      There's a thread on avsforum.com that will get you started. Google "rew site:avsforum.com" and it's the first one in the results.

      I've used this combo to great effect, even to the point of generating PEQ/EQ settings for my (new to me) Xilica.

  6. "In its ads, YG Acoustics states that the Anat Reference II Professional is "The best loudspeaker on Earth. Period." Its impressive measured behavior doesn't detract from that claim.—John Atkinson"

    How much hyperbole can one man spew? How much hyperbole can one man stand? What happened to last month's best loudspeaker on earth?

    "Drive-units: 1" silk-dome tweeter, two 6" paper-cone midrange units, 10" carbon/paper-cone passive subwoofer, 10" carbon/paper-cone powered subwoofer.""Price: $107,000/pair, as reviewed (Reference II Professional)"

    Last time I looked, Dick Diamond insisted that the speaker had to be made from CRC machined billets of aluminum. That was for the similarly priced Sonja 1.1 and 1.3. Now we have paper, silk, carbon fiber. What a crock the whole thing is.

    Personally, based on my own analysis, I think even with this limited and poorly performed set of measurements, this thing stinks.

    "Frequency response: 20Hz–20kHz, –0.7dB. "

    Based on Atkinson's measurements, not even remotely close. In figure 4A the woofer is down 10 db at 20 hz and 4 db at 20 khz. In figure 7 response is + 4 db at 20 hz and -10 db at 20 khz. In figure 1 electrical impedance runs from over +90 degrees at 90 hz to -50 to -67 degrees over much of its range.

  7. SOUNDMIND,

    "We listen to sound fields"
    Sounds nice.
    And I guess you found the answer we've all been waiting for the last decades.
    And I guess you are not the kind of guy who keeps it to himself.
    So enlighten us audiophile nitwits.
    Share with us how to reach audiophile nirvana. Don't let us (listen) in the dark.
    Or do you want us to think it's just brag ? And you don't know more than all the stupid designers....

    1. Dumbed down so that most technically trained people can understand the theory and a simplified variant of one of the inventions based on it is in my patent. I've mentioned it too many times here already. Besides, I've lost interest in it.

      Lately I've been hanging around in the Bell Labs Anomaly Room during some of my spare time. WOW! 18 giant touch sensitive giant TV screens can do amazing things. You think you have a home theater? Not like this one you don't.

      https://www.google.com/search?q=bell+labs+anomaly+room&biw=1280&bih=537&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwihio7k39jOAhUFHR4KHR-rC6wQ_AUIBigB

  8. > DISCLAIMER< This comment has nothing to do with the subject.
    At the end of your videos, there used to be a cute gal in a pink blouse near the front middle of the people waving. Is she somewhere else in the crowd now, or did she leave the company?

    Just wondering.

    Mongo

  9. > DISCLAIMER< This comment has nothing to do with the subject.
    At the end of your videos, there used to be a cute gal in a pink blouse near the front middle of the people waving. Is she somewhere else in the crowd now, or did she leave the company?

    Just wondering.

    Mongo

  10. > DISCLAIMER< This comment has nothing to do with the subject.
    At the end of your videos, there used to be a cute gal in a pink blouse near the front middle of the people waving. Is she somewhere else in the crowd now, or did she leave the company?

    Just wondering.

    Mongo

  11. Different cultures show respect in different ways & therefore the more travelled & the more 'worldly' you are the better prepared you are to be a part of that cultural respect.
    A lot of Australians find that they have to explain to people from other cultures that we 'Aussies', & especially my generation, show our love, admiration & yes respect towards each other by good natured ribbing & by poking fun at each other; seemingly being disrespectful towards each other.
    The more we 'turn it up' the more respect we are showing towards each other, because, well, the alternative of being politically correct all the time & treating others with 'kitt gloves' means that there is 'an unnecessary distance' between people.
    To some it's hard to explain; you either get it or you don't.
    When you give an Aussie 'some sh!t' with an accompanying laugh or just a wry smile, then he knows that you're on his level of 'human contact'
    We are not a nation that wants to be wrapped in cotton wool & our boisterousness can very easily be misunderstood by other cultures.
    Our New Zealand cousins are generally the same.
    Personally I find it refreshing when the children of immigrants to Australia become part of our 'disrespectful culture' understanding that it's a kind of reverse metaphor.
    Some of us do find political correctness & always having to walk on eggshells in case we accidently disrespect someone... well... 'vomitworthy' 🙂

    I've always found honesty to be the best policy & by that I mean that if I cross someone's 'line' in conversation then I expect to be pulled-up & told so, so that I can apologise, explain myself & refrain from doing it again to that person in future...no harm done.
    Often people wont 'pipe-up' & then the opportunity is lost & we're back to being boring &/or walking on eggshells.

    Life's a tightrope sometimes.

  12. I might give this a try. Sadly I was vastly disappointed by the 2011 remasters, which are classic examples of just crunching the music through a limiter (the remastered version of Animals got high marks on stevehoffman, but it’s a muddy mess with less than half the DR of the original).

    Let’s face it, Gilmour-era Floyd is Dad Rock, but it is very good Dad Rock (I put on pulse while reading the article, and it’s quite a lot of fun).

  13. Respect has to be earned. There’s a difference between it and courtesy.

    When someone demands respect but doesn’t show courtesy in return is where I draw the line. They haven’t earned my respect. On the other hand even if a persons viewpoint is diametrically opposed to mine but they show the courtesy of listening then I have a level of respect.

    There’s also having respect for a title or a position and that’s different than having respect for the person who holds that title.

    I’m going to keep my resolution tangible. Have more fun listening to reproduced music and spend less time listening critically.

    Happy New Year All

  14. (Consistent with the date and the topic)

    Serve this, to give my testimony of admiration and heartfelt thanks to Paul McGowan.

    I say admiration, because throughout the history of home audio there has NOT been a manufacturer that has worked and continues to do so, so tirelessly to position his brand beyond the most extensive limits of his own goal. This is the vision I have of Mr. McGowan's work.

    For which, he has created and successfully, his own effective means: Today's video, Today's podcast, Copper Magazine, Paul's Post, not to mention his book.

    All these means that could have been glimpsed and materialized by other manufacturers have not been, since only Paul's mind conceived them.

    And I also said thanks, because Paul´s Post with all its 56,080 visitors, constitutes a giant slate from where we can learn (thanks to the presentations of the participants and Paul) things related to audio, and also this, opens the possibility to make friends with everyone.

    The unlimited fertility of his resources to expose topics day after day, year after year, is worthy of all praise.

    I honestly believe that Pul McGowan has earned a place of honor, of course, fully deserved in the history of audio-industry, as it is today.

    May this new year, bring intellectual growth and good health to the entire PSA family and particularly to the subscribers of this forum, and that in addition, the technical quality becomes preeminent in the writings of each one, for the good of all.

    Happy 2020 to each and every one of you.

  15. IMO there is a difference between civility and respect. Every person I encounter initially deserves civility and gets it unless and until that person does not show civility towards me. Respect on the other hand has to be earned by what people have done. It could be almost anything in any field. Even an act of kindness with no expectation of a reward deserves respect.

  16. Robert, thanks for your thoughts on the high-resolution initiative AND for your positive mentions of my activities in this area. As an expert and since my involvement with your CEA/CTA high-end audio board several years ago, I have continued to research and explore the realities of so-called "hi-res" audio. The key question is whether "hi-res" a valid next step in audio technology or a hoax conceived, designed, and perpetrated by the music industry? In fact, I was on a sabbatical from my university professorship (I'm in charge of the audio recording program at CSUDH) to conduct a survey of high-end audio enthusiasts as to whether they could identify a bona fide high-resolution audio track (from my catalog of over 85 native 96/24-bit-PCM recordings) vs. a standard CD-Audio or "Redbook" downconversion of the same recording.

    Over 600 people requested the test files and several hundred have listened to them on their home systems (speakers and headphones) and reported back using an online submission form. The preliminary results indicate that "hi-res audio" or "hi-res music" delivers no perceptible, sonic improvement over the 44.1/16-bit PCM compact disc! As much as I and many others (including the consumer electronics manufacturers, record labels, artists, and trade organizations) want hi-res to be real and usher in a new era of enhanced fidelity, it turns out that even REAL hi-res music such as the AIX Records catalog (as you know most of the catalogs being digitized at hi-res specs remain standard-res fidelity) is indistinguishable from CDs.

    Happy New Year

  17. What makes my recordings sound so good is the manner in which they were recorded, the use of real room reverberation, the lack of any dynamics compression, stereo miking techniques, and the avoidance of EQ and other digital processing during the mixdown. If the music industry and related organizations want to deliver higher fidelity to consumers, all they have to do is start making records that preserve the sound of the original instruments and voices. And I would also strongly suggest embracing surround sound as did the film industry.

    Sadly, the hoax that is hi-res music will continue because it's all about corporate profits and not about fidelity. Journalists, reviewers, and pundits will continue to advocate for all things "hi-res" because it's "good for commerce" (to quote a fellow board member at a CEA meeting). No studies have ever confirmed that anyone can actually hear the "dramatic" improvements promised by the industry. It's not about spending more money on a system capable of delivering the promised improvements in fidelity offered by "hi-res". The truth is that absolutely wonderful recordings can be delivered in CD spec and crappy recordings can be issued in hi-res. But there is no evidence that hi-res audio/music is a needed next step in the audiophile hobby.

  18. I learned that Ritz-Carlton has a motto: “We are Ladies and Gentlemen serving Ladies and Gentlemen”. Differences between civility and respect aside, I’ve tried to apply this in personal interactions (and have failed at times too, but it’s good to keep trying anyway).

    Happy New Year!

  19. Respect is causing others you are with to be relaxed. Plain and simple.

    The society we are being programmed by today is anti-freedom. No respect if it gets its way.

  20. Different cultures show respect in different ways & therefore the more travelled & the more 'worldly' you are the better prepared you are to be a part of that cultural respect.
    A lot of Australians find that they have to explain to people from other cultures that we 'Aussies', & especially my generation, show our love, admiration & yes respect towards each other by good natured ribbing & by poking fun at each other; seemingly being disrespectful towards each other.
    The more we 'turn it up' the more respect we are showing towards each other, because, well, the alternative of being politically correct all the time & treating others with 'kitt gloves' means that there is 'an unnecessary distance' between people.
    To some it's hard to explain; you either get it or you don't.
    When you give an Aussie 'some sh!t' with an accompanying laugh or just a wry smile, then he knows that you're on his level of 'human contact'
    We are not a nation that wants to be wrapped in cotton wool & our boisterousness can very easily be misunderstood by other cultures.
    Our New Zealand cousins are generally the same.
    Personally I find it refreshing when the children of immigrants to Australia become part of our 'disrespectful culture' understanding that it's a kind of reverse metaphor.
    Some of us do find political correctness & always having to walk on eggshells in case we accidently disrespect someone... well... 'vomitworthy' 🙂

    I've always found honesty to be the best policy & by that I mean that if I cross someone's 'line' in conversation then I expect to be pulled-up & told so, so that I can apologise, explain myself & refrain from doing it again to that person in future...no harm done.
    Often people wont 'pipe-up' & then the opportunity is lost & we're back to being boring &/or walking on eggshells.

    Life's a tightrope sometimes.

  21. I might give this a try. Sadly I was vastly disappointed by the 2011 remasters, which are classic examples of just crunching the music through a limiter (the remastered version of Animals got high marks on stevehoffman, but it’s a muddy mess with less than half the DR of the original).

    Let’s face it, Gilmour-era Floyd is Dad Rock, but it is very good Dad Rock (I put on pulse while reading the article, and it’s quite a lot of fun).

  22. Respect has to be earned. There’s a difference between it and courtesy.

    When someone demands respect but doesn’t show courtesy in return is where I draw the line. They haven’t earned my respect. On the other hand even if a persons viewpoint is diametrically opposed to mine but they show the courtesy of listening then I have a level of respect.

    There’s also having respect for a title or a position and that’s different than having respect for the person who holds that title.

    I’m going to keep my resolution tangible. Have more fun listening to reproduced music and spend less time listening critically.

    Happy New Year All

  23. (Consistent with the date and the topic)

    Serve this, to give my testimony of admiration and heartfelt thanks to Paul McGowan.

    I say admiration, because throughout the history of home audio there has NOT been a manufacturer that has worked and continues to do so, so tirelessly to position his brand beyond the most extensive limits of his own goal. This is the vision I have of Mr. McGowan's work.

    For which, he has created and successfully, his own effective means: Today's video, Today's podcast, Copper Magazine, Paul's Post, not to mention his book.

    All these means that could have been glimpsed and materialized by other manufacturers have not been, since only Paul's mind conceived them.

    And I also said thanks, because Paul´s Post with all its 56,080 visitors, constitutes a giant slate from where we can learn (thanks to the presentations of the participants and Paul) things related to audio, and also this, opens the possibility to make friends with everyone.

    The unlimited fertility of his resources to expose topics day after day, year after year, is worthy of all praise.

    I honestly believe that Pul McGowan has earned a place of honor, of course, fully deserved in the history of audio-industry, as it is today.

    May this new year, bring intellectual growth and good health to the entire PSA family and particularly to the subscribers of this forum, and that in addition, the technical quality becomes preeminent in the writings of each one, for the good of all.

    Happy 2020 to each and every one of you.

  24. IMO there is a difference between civility and respect. Every person I encounter initially deserves civility and gets it unless and until that person does not show civility towards me. Respect on the other hand has to be earned by what people have done. It could be almost anything in any field. Even an act of kindness with no expectation of a reward deserves respect.

  25. Robert, thanks for your thoughts on the high-resolution initiative AND for your positive mentions of my activities in this area. As an expert and since my involvement with your CEA/CTA high-end audio board several years ago, I have continued to research and explore the realities of so-called "hi-res" audio. The key question is whether "hi-res" a valid next step in audio technology or a hoax conceived, designed, and perpetrated by the music industry? In fact, I was on a sabbatical from my university professorship (I'm in charge of the audio recording program at CSUDH) to conduct a survey of high-end audio enthusiasts as to whether they could identify a bona fide high-resolution audio track (from my catalog of over 85 native 96/24-bit-PCM recordings) vs. a standard CD-Audio or "Redbook" downconversion of the same recording.

    Over 600 people requested the test files and several hundred have listened to them on their home systems (speakers and headphones) and reported back using an online submission form. The preliminary results indicate that "hi-res audio" or "hi-res music" delivers no perceptible, sonic improvement over the 44.1/16-bit PCM compact disc! As much as I and many others (including the consumer electronics manufacturers, record labels, artists, and trade organizations) want hi-res to be real and usher in a new era of enhanced fidelity, it turns out that even REAL hi-res music such as the AIX Records catalog (as you know most of the catalogs being digitized at hi-res specs remain standard-res fidelity) is indistinguishable from CDs.

    Happy New Year

  26. What makes my recordings sound so good is the manner in which they were recorded, the use of real room reverberation, the lack of any dynamics compression, stereo miking techniques, and the avoidance of EQ and other digital processing during the mixdown. If the music industry and related organizations want to deliver higher fidelity to consumers, all they have to do is start making records that preserve the sound of the original instruments and voices. And I would also strongly suggest embracing surround sound as did the film industry.

    Sadly, the hoax that is hi-res music will continue because it's all about corporate profits and not about fidelity. Journalists, reviewers, and pundits will continue to advocate for all things "hi-res" because it's "good for commerce" (to quote a fellow board member at a CEA meeting). No studies have ever confirmed that anyone can actually hear the "dramatic" improvements promised by the industry. It's not about spending more money on a system capable of delivering the promised improvements in fidelity offered by "hi-res". The truth is that absolutely wonderful recordings can be delivered in CD spec and crappy recordings can be issued in hi-res. But there is no evidence that hi-res audio/music is a needed next step in the audiophile hobby.

  27. I learned that Ritz-Carlton has a motto: “We are Ladies and Gentlemen serving Ladies and Gentlemen”. Differences between civility and respect aside, I’ve tried to apply this in personal interactions (and have failed at times too, but it’s good to keep trying anyway).

    Happy New Year!

  28. Respect is causing others you are with to be relaxed. Plain and simple.

    The society we are being programmed by today is anti-freedom. No respect if it gets its way.

  29. Different cultures show respect in different ways & therefore the more travelled & the more 'worldly' you are the better prepared you are to be a part of that cultural respect.
    A lot of Australians find that they have to explain to people from other cultures that we 'Aussies', & especially my generation, show our love, admiration & yes respect towards each other by good natured ribbing & by poking fun at each other; seemingly being disrespectful towards each other.
    The more we 'turn it up' the more respect we are showing towards each other, because, well, the alternative of being politically correct all the time & treating others with 'kitt gloves' means that there is 'an unnecessary distance' between people.
    To some it's hard to explain; you either get it or you don't.
    When you give an Aussie 'some sh!t' with an accompanying laugh or just a wry smile, then he knows that you're on his level of 'human contact'
    We are not a nation that wants to be wrapped in cotton wool & our boisterousness can very easily be misunderstood by other cultures.
    Our New Zealand cousins are generally the same.
    Personally I find it refreshing when the children of immigrants to Australia become part of our 'disrespectful culture' understanding that it's a kind of reverse metaphor.
    Some of us do find political correctness & always having to walk on eggshells in case we accidently disrespect someone... well... 'vomitworthy' 🙂

    I've always found honesty to be the best policy & by that I mean that if I cross someone's 'line' in conversation then I expect to be pulled-up & told so, so that I can apologise, explain myself & refrain from doing it again to that person in future...no harm done.
    Often people wont 'pipe-up' & then the opportunity is lost & we're back to being boring &/or walking on eggshells.

    Life's a tightrope sometimes.

  30. I might give this a try. Sadly I was vastly disappointed by the 2011 remasters, which are classic examples of just crunching the music through a limiter (the remastered version of Animals got high marks on stevehoffman, but it’s a muddy mess with less than half the DR of the original).

    Let’s face it, Gilmour-era Floyd is Dad Rock, but it is very good Dad Rock (I put on pulse while reading the article, and it’s quite a lot of fun).

  31. Respect has to be earned. There’s a difference between it and courtesy.

    When someone demands respect but doesn’t show courtesy in return is where I draw the line. They haven’t earned my respect. On the other hand even if a persons viewpoint is diametrically opposed to mine but they show the courtesy of listening then I have a level of respect.

    There’s also having respect for a title or a position and that’s different than having respect for the person who holds that title.

    I’m going to keep my resolution tangible. Have more fun listening to reproduced music and spend less time listening critically.

    Happy New Year All

  32. (Consistent with the date and the topic)

    Serve this, to give my testimony of admiration and heartfelt thanks to Paul McGowan.

    I say admiration, because throughout the history of home audio there has NOT been a manufacturer that has worked and continues to do so, so tirelessly to position his brand beyond the most extensive limits of his own goal. This is the vision I have of Mr. McGowan's work.

    For which, he has created and successfully, his own effective means: Today's video, Today's podcast, Copper Magazine, Paul's Post, not to mention his book.

    All these means that could have been glimpsed and materialized by other manufacturers have not been, since only Paul's mind conceived them.

    And I also said thanks, because Paul´s Post with all its 56,080 visitors, constitutes a giant slate from where we can learn (thanks to the presentations of the participants and Paul) things related to audio, and also this, opens the possibility to make friends with everyone.

    The unlimited fertility of his resources to expose topics day after day, year after year, is worthy of all praise.

    I honestly believe that Pul McGowan has earned a place of honor, of course, fully deserved in the history of audio-industry, as it is today.

    May this new year, bring intellectual growth and good health to the entire PSA family and particularly to the subscribers of this forum, and that in addition, the technical quality becomes preeminent in the writings of each one, for the good of all.

    Happy 2020 to each and every one of you.

  33. IMO there is a difference between civility and respect. Every person I encounter initially deserves civility and gets it unless and until that person does not show civility towards me. Respect on the other hand has to be earned by what people have done. It could be almost anything in any field. Even an act of kindness with no expectation of a reward deserves respect.

  34. Robert, thanks for your thoughts on the high-resolution initiative AND for your positive mentions of my activities in this area. As an expert and since my involvement with your CEA/CTA high-end audio board several years ago, I have continued to research and explore the realities of so-called "hi-res" audio. The key question is whether "hi-res" a valid next step in audio technology or a hoax conceived, designed, and perpetrated by the music industry? In fact, I was on a sabbatical from my university professorship (I'm in charge of the audio recording program at CSUDH) to conduct a survey of high-end audio enthusiasts as to whether they could identify a bona fide high-resolution audio track (from my catalog of over 85 native 96/24-bit-PCM recordings) vs. a standard CD-Audio or "Redbook" downconversion of the same recording.

    Over 600 people requested the test files and several hundred have listened to them on their home systems (speakers and headphones) and reported back using an online submission form. The preliminary results indicate that "hi-res audio" or "hi-res music" delivers no perceptible, sonic improvement over the 44.1/16-bit PCM compact disc! As much as I and many others (including the consumer electronics manufacturers, record labels, artists, and trade organizations) want hi-res to be real and usher in a new era of enhanced fidelity, it turns out that even REAL hi-res music such as the AIX Records catalog (as you know most of the catalogs being digitized at hi-res specs remain standard-res fidelity) is indistinguishable from CDs.

    Happy New Year

  35. What makes my recordings sound so good is the manner in which they were recorded, the use of real room reverberation, the lack of any dynamics compression, stereo miking techniques, and the avoidance of EQ and other digital processing during the mixdown. If the music industry and related organizations want to deliver higher fidelity to consumers, all they have to do is start making records that preserve the sound of the original instruments and voices. And I would also strongly suggest embracing surround sound as did the film industry.

    Sadly, the hoax that is hi-res music will continue because it's all about corporate profits and not about fidelity. Journalists, reviewers, and pundits will continue to advocate for all things "hi-res" because it's "good for commerce" (to quote a fellow board member at a CEA meeting). No studies have ever confirmed that anyone can actually hear the "dramatic" improvements promised by the industry. It's not about spending more money on a system capable of delivering the promised improvements in fidelity offered by "hi-res". The truth is that absolutely wonderful recordings can be delivered in CD spec and crappy recordings can be issued in hi-res. But there is no evidence that hi-res audio/music is a needed next step in the audiophile hobby.

  36. I learned that Ritz-Carlton has a motto: “We are Ladies and Gentlemen serving Ladies and Gentlemen”. Differences between civility and respect aside, I’ve tried to apply this in personal interactions (and have failed at times too, but it’s good to keep trying anyway).

    Happy New Year!

  37. Respect is causing others you are with to be relaxed. Plain and simple.

    The society we are being programmed by today is anti-freedom. No respect if it gets its way.

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