Cherry picking science

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Our science has extended life, fed billions, eliminated diseases, healed infections, connected the world, gotten us into space, and brought the greatest musical performances into our homes at the touch of a button or the sound of our voice. We expect more wonders to unfold in front of our eyes because of our science.

And yet, when our science tells us something we don’t want to hear about: manmade global warming, vaccines are safe, the Earth is round, simple audio measurements don’t tell us what we hear, we decide those particular science facts aren’t accurate.

Is science infallible and always to be believed? Heck no. Consider the misguided contributions of Thomas Midgley, a person that single-handedly came close to destroying the planet.  Though his direction and motivations were flawed, it was still science that got him where he wanted to go.

Wouldn’t it be nice if we could choose which of the laws of physics we accept? It would certainly make life easier.

I very much do not want to believe in Simultaneity. To be honest, it simply offends me from any number of points.

Or, Bernoulli’s Principal that a change in air pressure can lift a 747 into the air. Doesn’t make sense to me, despite the evidence to the contrary.

What I have learned over the years is to trust science. Trust it first, question the methodology second, the conclusions third. When we can’t measure what we hear I don’t question the science, only the methodology by which we apply it.

It’s good to question. Scientists are the most skeptical people on the planet. Yet, if it’s my life, health, or safety at question I’d sooner trust the science than YouTube or Twitter.

Just sayin.