Is there a PS server in the works?

November 16, 2017
 by Paul McGowan

75 comments on “Is there a PS server in the works?”

  1. I think that it is well known that the Classical Music producers have failed to generate a metadata protocol, or standard, that is effective for Classical Music. Therefore the Classical Music collector must develop a metadata protocol that harmonizes the metadata between different Classical Music producers.

    When I started down the digital road some 4 or 5 years ago I investigated different music storage software packages. I chose iTUNES because the basic display has the right approach (I refer in particular to the column display) and one can “re-purpose” some of the fields to ones own needs (e.g. I use “Groupings” for Opus number + Descriptor). I also chose iTUNES because I considered that to be an “industrial standard” and also had fond hopes that one day APPLE might be more friendly to Classical Music fans.

    I now have a music server (Aurender) which works extremely well. Their approach of a minimalist computer unit controlled by an iPAD I find very good. The User Interface is very good but is basic. I cannot, for example, sort a composer by Opus number – actually I cannot even see the “Groupings”.

    Your comment about the User Interface on a server is especially important, I feel, for Classical Music fans. The basic requirements would be: Composer; Opus No; Descriptor; Ensemble; Conductor; multiple artist fields; and Notes (freeform). The User Interface would include the possibility to create a table display. The most basic would allow the selection of Composer and then that composer’s works sorted by Opus No. Highly desirable is to view all of the works by a single artist selected from the multiple artist fields (e.g. see all the tracks and works with Sofie von Otter, even those where the artist would be a bit player, or have just a couple of tracks on a CD). The idea to be able retrieve material from the Internet (I have not tried Roon) in a slick fashion is nice and a “nice to have”. However going directly to the Internet to retrieve additional material is perfectly workable – one can use the iPAD controller in the music chair.

    In other words, for Classical Music lovers I believer that the most important part of the User Interface is to provide the ability to catalogue (or index) the music metadata and to be able to present that in a form that is convenient for retrieving works by composer, by artist, or whatever. That should be, in my opinion, the basic capability. I have the equivalent of over 3,000 CD’s, which is probably fairly typical. I think that a starting point for a Classical Music interface would be well served by combining the features of the Aurender Conductor with the features of iTUNES (but with a more flexible metadata editor – I currently use Yate).

    One of the nice features of iTUNES is that the prompter to complete inputs to the fields works very well. After completing a hundred or so CD’s the editing process using iTUNES really enables one to work very quickly.

    1. The worst part of file-based music playback is finding the music you want to play. When your collection reaches a certain point, it’s hard to remember every detail of every album in your collection. My collection numbers over 700 albums, and I know many collections are much larger. Seems like I spend an inordinate amount of time just searching for music to play. There are two facets to searching: browsing, which is looking over your collection to find something you’d like to hear when you don’t have a specific album in mind; and searching, which is looking for a specific album you want to hear.

      Interesting view from kiwimagic on the ideal server for classical music. I also listen mostly to classical music and have never used the Opus number in a search, but otherwise agree with kiwimagic’s desired information. I would also like a field that tells me the solo instrument or instruments involved (like violin) or the type of voice employed in a piece (like bass). kiwimagic asks for a descriptor–I concur, but would like that to include both the title of the album and the musical works found on the album. Example: I have an album named “If you Love for Beauty vol. II” with a recording of Chausson’s-Poème de l’Amour et de la Mer. I’d like to be able to search for both the album name and the pieces on the album. I would also lobby for a folder view of the drive where the music files are stored, and would like to be able to read the album notes that come in the CD booklet if they are provided–for operas, the libretto is often contained there. It’s also important for the server to be able to render all formats of music files, like DSD and FLAC–not sure if iTunes does that. And of course, MQA, which is usually encoded as a FLAC file. Knowing PS Audio, whatever they produce will probably be upgradeable, so if yet another file format shows up, they will probably figure out how to play it.

      Vade Forrester

      1. It might be that if you play music yourself that you identify more with the Opus number. However, even if I did not play music, I think that my most important fields would be the composer and the model number. My direction is the basic stuff that you need to rapidly find music (composer, opus, artist, ensemble, conductor). Additional information, such as album notes, is desirable but more in the “nice to have” area., especially as it is so easy to use the Internet if your controller is an iPAD, or similar. Also, at this time I am not sure that the album notes are included with downloads in a way that makes them easily searchable.

    2. I agree with Vade Forrester and Kiwimagic regarding how difficult is to have a classical music library well organized and easily searchable. I use Audirvana+ and from my view is quite good offering up to 18 fields to order and search the music and the possibility to read the liner notes from the iPad app when placed together with the “disc” tracks, but I miss some things in it.
      At the end, I think that classical music has so many ways to be enjoyed that a very flexible system is needed to accommodate the needs of everyone
      – Basic for me is to offer fields for composer, conductor, ensemble, soloists, instruments, style, musical period, recording year, production year, remastering year, label (also opus number, version and voice type is a good idea)
      – To offer “unlimited and blank” fields to be used any way you decide: I realize that I use to play certain music more in the mornings than in the evenings and the other way around. Another example: I am using Idagio as streaming service and they offer the “mood mode”: happy, angry, joyful, melancholic, ……. and it is an excellent idea
      – To offer a quick and clear navigation of each album image, filtered or ordered by any of the criteria above mentioned.
      – To have an effective method to deal with albums with several composers, soloists, ensembles, etc., i.e.: Marta Argerich and friends 2016, Brahms Complete Chamber Works, ….
      I hope that PSaudio develop a system able to accommodate all these “easy and simple requests” 😉

  2. I noticed that you recommend Roon. I have thought seriously about buying and installing Roon on my MacBook pro. I already have a ton of music on my computer in Songbird , jRiver and iTunes . How does Roon integrate and work with these collections — or does it ? Can music be imported from jRiver ,for example, to Roon . I’ve looked for these answers on the Roon website — no help. I suppose that, in today’s world, I should instinctively know these things, but I don’t.

    1. Think of all your files located in their folder and in some network or computer location. Once you install Roon you Direct it to where your music files are and use Roon Desktop to play your music. It becomes the librarian and adds amazing value understanding much more about the music genra artist history relationships songwriters influences etc

      Your files are already are organized in some basic fashion Roon presents it to you differently as well as has choices to how and where you play it across your home network.

    2. I looked at Roon but seriously, I’d rather play music than dink around with a computer while listening. I work on a computer for a living; last thing I want is something spewing even more pointless information at me.

      With JRiver, I type in what I want in the search box, and there are the choices right in front of me. If it’s Bernard Haitink night at Casa Rudy, or I’m wanting to hear all of the Rachmaninoff PCs in numerical order (OK, I’m weird like that), one or two word searches get me exactly where I need to be in terms of selecting what I want to hear. I am not a big fan of JRiver but for the time being, it works well enough. Plus, it is platform agnostic; ANY software that forces me to use one single platform will never be purchased here. I do not agree whatsoever with “walled off” proprietary technology. The more open a computer technology is, the more flexible and useful it becomes. 25+ years in the technology business has taught me this…

  3. I once had a job interview for an RF Lab Tech/Manager years ago. Once the talking part was done. I was shown the lab (always a sign that I nailed the interview and a job offer will result). First thing he says to me. Here’s an RF Amplifier. Please turn it on for me (in his polite English voice – PHD who knew his way around a lab). When I reached for the negative supply and turned it on, all good and then the positive supply also good. Then he asked to turn it off. So I reached for the positive power supply first, turned it off, and then the negative supply I powered off. Success. He’s already told me the job was mine once I hit the -ve supply. A not so lucky interviewee had messed up the power up sequence of an RF Amplifier and he was politely shown the door . Now in audio circuits (correct me if I’m wrong), the power up is simultaneous.

  4. Obama quoted Mandela’s famous quotation from his biography "No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love. For love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite." I thought that one of the most profound statements, because is says everything about how we are born a blank palette and are conditioned by our social environment, but ultimately we are all capable of change. It’s a very conscious, personal thing. It stuck in my mind and applies to our most meaningful relationships with people and the our rather less important relationship with consumer goods. One day everyone will love efficient Class D power, media streaming and electric vehicles (I’m now paying 7c/kw to charge mine and have a little smart meter in the kitchen that tells me realtime how much it’s costing me – which beats getting a bill every 3 months).

  5. It’s so damn tempting to ask if I can have your Phil Lesh bass for free, if you won’t be needing it. Since I’m also dealing with cancer at present, I’ll leave that awful request for someone else to make. Godspeed, Dan. Loved your playing on City Works of Fiction.

  6. My expectations concerning the gigantic improvements in sound quality claimed by the inventors of RBCD and digital audio were huge. The disappointment after listening to the first CDs was extremely huge. The only advantage I could attest was convenience and comfort. But soon digital audiophiles recommended to thoroughly clean each CD, color and grinding the outer rim and to avoid magnetic pucks. They even strongly recommended belt drives and treatment of the CD by using flashlights and demagnetizing devices. However sound quality didn’t improve and the CD simply replaced the compact cassette for car stereo. Seeing the ongoing developments in DAC design (clock accuracy, reconstruction filter designs etc) I wonder if i can expect significant improvements in the future or if the limits are reached already. My expectations remain low!
    Strange enough my expectations were far exceed compared to my strongest skepticism when applying RACE (crosstalk cancellation) while digital room correction – highly recommended by many reviewers – never could meet my expectations. At least you have to scrutinize your own expectations and the interest of every reviewer!

  7. "However sound quality didn’t improve and the CD simply replaced the compact cassette for car stereo"….
    You may have a preference for lp or cd (I don’t go into that discussion) but compared to the beginnings of cd (and they did not sound good back then) they now sound lightyears better.
    Comparing that to compact cassette is downright ridiculous.
    I you don’t hear that, your eardrums must be ruptured. Or be a hardcore digital hater.

  8. As some of us say, there is what digital audio could have been and then there was the train wreck we got. Manufacturers of chips, recording and playback equipment jumped in without having done their homework. The rise of synthesizer pop music having little dynamic range led to artists in other genres demanding that their recordings play just as loud in broadcast programming meetings. This was achieved by clipping the CD masters. The clipping offers no benefit for vinyl so leaving it off made vinyl sound significantly better. Now the consumer electronics industry appears about to trip over their manhood once again with "immersive" surround.

  9. I rarely repeat the home spun philosophy of the Beatles but… life is what happens to you while you’re making your plans. My life didn’t work out the way I originally planned it. Not even close. Surprise surprise.

    Back in the early days when this was the same audiophile hobby for me as it was and still is for everyone else who shares it the experts kept promising concert hall realism, that was their goal. What did I know? I was in high school and they were experienced engineers. But it wasn’t happening. I don’t think it bothered me until I experimented with quadraphonic sound and realized it didn’t work the way they said it would.

    https://www.psaudio.com/askpaul/have-we-reached-the-zenith-of-audio/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoXecfbPkKw

    So I considered why after all of the hype it didn’t work. And contrary to my expectations I figured it out. By this time I was a degreed engineer and had a lot more knowledge about a lot more things and had worked on figuring out the solutions to many problems in many areas. The skill to do that is IMO the most important thing they teach you in engineering school. But the solution seemed very complex and nearly impossible to implement. But I tried anyway expecting and hoping for a little improvement. And contrary to my expectations I got a lot more than I thought I would or bargained for. The effect was far beyond my expectations. Even in its simplified form adapted for recordings it’s a maze of time delays, equalizers, mixers, preamplifiers, amplifiers, and speakers not used in the way they were intended. Suddenly the solution to the problem went from a system of engineered parts to an engineered system of parts whose perfection for each element in audiophile terms became much less important just so long as they performed their intended function. It was the system design that mattered and one element of the engineered system was the acoustics of the listening room itself to be incorporated, integrated, exploited as an integral design element, not something to fight a losing battle against. But it couldn’t be just any old room. It had its requirements to perform its function too.

    A certain audiophile/manufacturer visited my house several years ago to hear what I’d created. Having had a lifetime of experience he had certain expectations. He’d heard it all or so he’d thought. From the look on his face his first reaction seemed like puzzlement, incredulity, bewilderment, and then he actually dropped his jaw in astonishment. Whatever it was, it was not like anything he’d ever expected to hear or had heard before out of a machine. I don’t demonstrate it to people often but when I do a common reaction is laughter due to confounding expectations. You don’t expect to hear sounds in a 4000 cubic foot room you’d hear in a million cubic foot room. That just doesn’t happen … unless you figure out how to make it happen. Illusions that trick our senses, what successful magic tricks are all about are based on science. Making one thing appear to be another thing. Figure out why something is perceived to be a certain way and then figure out how to make the same thing appear to happen using different means. Solve that problem and you’e on your way to creating much better and different sound systems.

  10. I found Windom to be a lot clearer and sharper, especially the bass. However, it does evoke a lot less foot tapping than Snowmass did. But, the new clarity is hard to argue with. I did have to move my speakers around (further apart, further from the back wall) to get them not to sound horrible. Not sure I understand that. I look forward to the next update.

  11. Paul – thanks again for your continuing efforts to educate….hope to visit sometime in the not too distant future.

    My opinion is that PS Audio should round out it’s offering by adding cabling products which are matched to its components & speakers that most importantly……..represent a good value. This will serve its customers by eliminating the need to continually seek out the next best solution. As I’m sure everyone will agree, the law of diminishing returns kicks in relatively quickly where (often subjective) incremental improvement requires a big investment and therefore is ripe for "snake oil" claims of significant improvement from metallurgy, dialectic design, cabling architecture, termination, etc. Perhaps maybe explore acquisition of licensing LAT International’s (now closed due to owner’s health-you might actually know Lou) SilverFuse technology which delivers the best of both the Copper and Silver Worlds at a reasonable price?

    Side Note: While AQ does indeed offer a wide array of cables at varying price points (which I have owned, some of which are still in use), it always does not deliver a good value.

  12. Imaginary worlds are based on past realities. No past experience no future imagination. Past experience is a must no matter how little or how remotely connected.There has to be a reference . As for expectations they can be both positive and negative depending on the circumstances. But the eventual realty need not be what one expected. It all boils down to 1. Nothing ventured nothing gained and 2. Once bitten twice shy. It is always a result of which outweighs the other in decisions one takes except in situations where one dives headlong into things without prior thought or knowledge. Life is interesting is it not ?

  13. Paul, You could just as easily be writing philosophy and psychology books. For a follow up book to your "99% True" how about something like- "The Psychology of The Listening Experience"?

  14. Oh dear! Here he goes again.

    It would be nice if he read the literature from Daniel Kahnemann and Aaron Tversky dealing with definitions of types of bias. There is a lot of work done by many people based on this. Kahnemann, a psychologist, even won a Nobel prize in Economics for his lifetime work.

  15. I understand the confusion. Back in the day, I worked as a comm systems engineer under contract to NASA and did a fair bit of analysis, simulation, and occasional test of satellite communications systems (end-to-end systems, receivers, oscillators, antennas, etc.). One day, for some reason, I became completely muddled with how a receive antenna can be polarized (horizontal, vertical, circular)…it was obvious at the time how one could control the phasing of the signal sent to a transmit antenna and thus determine its polarization, but that day I just couldn’t figure out how it could work for a receive antenna. Duality is the key, but I spent a full day working through it. Negative voltage, indeed.

  16. I once had a job interview for an RF Lab Tech/Manager years ago. Once the talking part was done. I was shown the lab (always a sign that I nailed the interview and a job offer will result). First thing he says to me. Here’s an RF Amplifier. Please turn it on for me (in his polite English voice – PHD who knew his way around a lab). When I reached for the negative supply and turned it on, all good and then the positive supply also good. Then he asked to turn it off. So I reached for the positive power supply first, turned it off, and then the negative supply I powered off. Success. He’s already told me the job was mine once I hit the -ve supply. A not so lucky interviewee had messed up the power up sequence of an RF Amplifier and he was politely shown the door . Now in audio circuits (correct me if I’m wrong), the power up is simultaneous.

  17. Obama quoted Mandela’s famous quotation from his biography "No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love. For love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite." I thought that one of the most profound statements, because is says everything about how we are born a blank palette and are conditioned by our social environment, but ultimately we are all capable of change. It’s a very conscious, personal thing. It stuck in my mind and applies to our most meaningful relationships with people and the our rather less important relationship with consumer goods. One day everyone will love efficient Class D power, media streaming and electric vehicles (I’m now paying 7c/kw to charge mine and have a little smart meter in the kitchen that tells me realtime how much it’s costing me – which beats getting a bill every 3 months).

  18. "However sound quality didn’t improve and the CD simply replaced the compact cassette for car stereo"….
    You may have a preference for lp or cd (I don’t go into that discussion) but compared to the beginnings of cd (and they did not sound good back then) they now sound lightyears better.
    Comparing that to compact cassette is downright ridiculous.
    I you don’t hear that, your eardrums must be ruptured. Or be a hardcore digital hater.

  19. As some of us say, there is what digital audio could have been and then there was the train wreck we got. Manufacturers of chips, recording and playback equipment jumped in without having done their homework. The rise of synthesizer pop music having little dynamic range led to artists in other genres demanding that their recordings play just as loud in broadcast programming meetings. This was achieved by clipping the CD masters. The clipping offers no benefit for vinyl so leaving it off made vinyl sound significantly better. Now the consumer electronics industry appears about to trip over their manhood once again with "immersive" surround.

  20. I rarely repeat the home spun philosophy of the Beatles but… life is what happens to you while you’re making your plans. My life didn’t work out the way I originally planned it. Not even close. Surprise surprise.

    Back in the early days when this was the same audiophile hobby for me as it was and still is for everyone else who shares it the experts kept promising concert hall realism, that was their goal. What did I know? I was in high school and they were experienced engineers. But it wasn’t happening. I don’t think it bothered me until I experimented with quadraphonic sound and realized it didn’t work the way they said it would.

    https://www.psaudio.com/askpaul/have-we-reached-the-zenith-of-audio/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoXecfbPkKw

    So I considered why after all of the hype it didn’t work. And contrary to my expectations I figured it out. By this time I was a degreed engineer and had a lot more knowledge about a lot more things and had worked on figuring out the solutions to many problems in many areas. The skill to do that is IMO the most important thing they teach you in engineering school. But the solution seemed very complex and nearly impossible to implement. But I tried anyway expecting and hoping for a little improvement. And contrary to my expectations I got a lot more than I thought I would or bargained for. The effect was far beyond my expectations. Even in its simplified form adapted for recordings it’s a maze of time delays, equalizers, mixers, preamplifiers, amplifiers, and speakers not used in the way they were intended. Suddenly the solution to the problem went from a system of engineered parts to an engineered system of parts whose perfection for each element in audiophile terms became much less important just so long as they performed their intended function. It was the system design that mattered and one element of the engineered system was the acoustics of the listening room itself to be incorporated, integrated, exploited as an integral design element, not something to fight a losing battle against. But it couldn’t be just any old room. It had its requirements to perform its function too.

    A certain audiophile/manufacturer visited my house several years ago to hear what I’d created. Having had a lifetime of experience he had certain expectations. He’d heard it all or so he’d thought. From the look on his face his first reaction seemed like puzzlement, incredulity, bewilderment, and then he actually dropped his jaw in astonishment. Whatever it was, it was not like anything he’d ever expected to hear or had heard before out of a machine. I don’t demonstrate it to people often but when I do a common reaction is laughter due to confounding expectations. You don’t expect to hear sounds in a 4000 cubic foot room you’d hear in a million cubic foot room. That just doesn’t happen … unless you figure out how to make it happen. Illusions that trick our senses, what successful magic tricks are all about are based on science. Making one thing appear to be another thing. Figure out why something is perceived to be a certain way and then figure out how to make the same thing appear to happen using different means. Solve that problem and you’e on your way to creating much better and different sound systems.

  21. I would never agree that there is a strict analogy between a 2-D photo and 3-D sound image intended by stereo which should at least create “depth” as you always claim. But I would see an analogy in that way that a listener having a more holistic “view” on recorded music would prefer a high PRaT factor compared to a more analytical listener preferring high resolution of finest details (an endless decay of a plucked string for instance). I have listened to different loudspeakers fed by the same system and strange enough one group delivered high PRaT factor while another group revealed finest details but never got me immersed into the music! What’s going on here?

  22. I enjoy photography, but am one of those who only use lenses with fixed focal length. No zooming in or out for me. Work within one field of view, but there is plenty that you can do within that. I even use fixed lenses that can be purposely vague at the edges so that the brain is focused on the centre of the image, rather than being overburdened with too much detail.

    Of course such systems are also much smaller and compact, simpler and more practical to use.

    Different approaches, both equally arguable.

  23. A post to fully agree, beauty is found in the whole!

    The better a setup gets the more you surprisingly can get in parallel, which previously was an “either-or”. But especially the max. and more than natural detail level usually comes at a price. E.g. several DAC’s offer this detail level more than the DS and loose the music completely.

  24. It’s an interesting comparison. Vision and sound. In the majority of photos we take there will be a person or people, and that will be what we focus on, we want them to be as clear as possible in our picture. The human element in a photo is most important.
    When I listen to a sound system I’ll listen to the human voice first and foremost. So maybe just a well recorded vocal with guitar or perhaps piano. That way I can concentrate on the voice to see if it really sounds like someone is right there, playing in front of me. If that sounds great, more often than not the rest (bigger picture) takes care of itself. Too simplistic? Maybe, but it usually works for me.

  25. This post comes at an opportune time for me. I just sold off most of my system, as I needed to focus of getting my room and system optimized for home theater. The challenge for home theater front speakers is that their are people sitting in a row. The people watching to the left and right cannot be ignored for imaging. My Magnepans are wonderful in the middle, but are horrible off center. I elected to get HSU CCB-8 monitors, as they are wonderful at maintaining image from an off center position, and I have 2 15 inch HSU subs.

    I picked up a new Denon 4K capable receiver (which I use for a front end), feed it to my 95lb Outlaw Audio 5 channel amp with Blue Jeans Cable LC-1 cables. I tried feeding the Denon preamp with 44.1 Qobuz music from my iPhone using Airplay2. Nothing is broken in yet, but it sounds wonderful. I think some of this improvement is partially from the room correction performed by the HT preamp. There is a boldness and solidity to the music that was lost, at the expense of more detail. Switch the BJC cables out with the audiophile ones I was using, and things start edging back to where they were.

    It’s not where I want to be for a full channel system, but I’m definitely going to rebuild my 2 channel system (destined for a different room) with a different perspective and goal.

  26. As I see it, the difference between photography and audio is that a photo captures a brief moment in time. However, both can easily be manipulated. Too long of an exposure in photography and if anything moves it becomes a blur or streak. Too long of an exposure listening to a system you don’t like can lead to fatigue and disgust. Do you sit down and stare at a photo long periods of time, much like you might listen to a symphony?

    I fully agree that photography is a creative process, much as creating music is. Don’t like a part of photo? Crop it, change it in photoshop, etc. Don’t like something about the sound of your home rig? Then make a change.

    Just realize that any changes may longer represent the actual… whether seen or heard.

    As far beauty… the beauty is in the perspective of the beholder.

  27. Recordings that focus in on microscopic details you’d never hear live may appeal to audiophiles but they don’t appeal to me. I’ve got one recording of Billy Taylor 10 fingers where you can hear his fingernails hitting the keys. Others place microphones in places where sounds you’d never hear from a piano become more than audible. One recording of Earl Wild is miked in a way that when he puts his foot on a pedal you not only hear the damper mechanism of the piano you hear the material in his pants legs rubbing up against each other.

    When I was young and we’d go to a concert my parents always told me to sit up front so that I could see the pianists fingers if there was a piano concerto. Well you really can’t see them because the performing stage is at a higher elevation than the front rows. There are many guitar recordings where you can hear the guitarists fingers rubbing against the strings. You don’t hear that at a performance. I never heard anything like that when I heard Segovia play at Carnegie Hall. The best sound is heard at some distance away. The sounds of multiple musicians blend and the acoustics of the space enhance it.

    The machine I invented allows me to change perspective. It allows me to move the performers from fairly up close just beyond the speakers to a perceived point over 100 feet away. A good distance for a symphony orchestra is probably about 60 to 80 feet. As you move away from the source the sound reaching you directly falls 6 db with every doubling of distance while the reverberant sound level remains fairly constant. So the further back you listen the greater the relative reverberation level but since that is most of the sound that reaches you everywhere in the audience it doesn’t get much softer. Its qualities change though. Additionally I can alter the effect acoustics play by changing many of its parameters.

    I want to hear sounds that are not too remote, not too close and I want to hear space. as spatial perception increases in size so does perceived acoustic power of the source. Can you go too far? Yes and it’s not good. Adjustments are critical.

    This is something like having a zoom lens on a camera that can go from closeup to wide angle. When photographs, particularly portraits of people become too sharp, photographers will sometimes air brush defects out or these days do the digital equivalent. In digital photography photographs are easily manipulated to get a desired effect with far greater ease than was possible with wet chemistry photography. Anyone remember what dodging and burning was when you worked in a darkroom? In those days you had to adjust for many things by selecting film, lighting, many factors. Fujichrome was famous for beautiful greens. Velvia for intense saturation. Ektachrome for a bluish cast. We had filters for everything. I’ve got a strange one from Tiffen made from German dydamiam glass that makes reds pop primarily intended for fall foliage photography. (one technique in color photography to get attention is to always have something red in your photographs. Diagonal lines add drama. Never put the skyline in a landscape halfway up the image. It’s boring. Look for geometric patterns.)

    Well it’s fun playing with the world this way. The more adjustments you can make the more fun it is experimenting with them to get what you want or just comparing results. Too bad. Taking away all the adjustments out of audio systems takes a lot of fun away. The irony is we have more ways to make adjustments than ever and they aren’t necessarily expensive either. Today’s high end audio systems remind me of an automatic camera that has one non zoom lens and you can only use one kind of film. Rather restrictive. You’re thinking inside the box and can’t get out. Neither can the music.

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