Opening Salvo

“I Got a Fever…”

It’s 102 – I got a fever and the only cure is more music!

Announcing a new contributor: Wayne Robins. Wayne is a veteran music critic and journalist, former editor of Creem and writer at Newsday/New York Newsday, book author and adjunct professor at St. John’s University.

Time passages: It’s hard to believe that it’s been five years since high-end audio legend Harry Pearson passed away. Dan Schwartz and I both worked for Harry and the five-year anniversary seems like a timely occasion to tell our stories of what it was like to work for a man unlike any other before or since.

In this issue: J.I. Agnew concludes his ode to cassette tape. Professor Larry Schenbeck interviews musicologist Steve Waksman, who has unique insights into the career of legendary soundman Bill Hanley. Dan Schwartz tells us how he got into high-end audio, and he and I reminisce about Harry Pearson of The Absolute Sound. Bob Wood reminisces about radio station CHAM in the the Great White North. Roy Hall contributes a wonderful story about his zaida (grandfather).

Time for some country in these pages as Anne E. Johnson looks at the too-short life of Patsy Cline, and also examines Gluck’s Orfeo ed Euridice. Tom Gibbs covers Miles Davis and Harry Styles and tries to stay awake for Moby. Wayne Robins tells us why year-end best of lists ain’t what they used to be. John Seetoo looks at BandLab, a company you might not have heard of – but will. Finally, cartoonist James Whitworth finds that breaking up is hard to do, Audio Anthropology uncovers the untruth and other relics, and our Parting Shot captures an American musical master.