PowerBase Trials - For Turntable and CD Player
  • I obtained good results with the PowerBase straight out of the box on day one. With both my turntable and SACD player, I heard more musical details, more image weight, more bass growl and articulation, more overall clarity, enhanced spatiality (more sound stage width and depth and enhanced sense of space between images) and more tactile sensation. On some recordings, there was an enhanced "thunderous" quality to bass notes.

    Both my turntable and SACD player were placed on Black Diamond Racing carbon fiber vibration abatement products. The SACD player rested on three Large Pucks which had a Mark 4 Cone (pointing downward) resting on top. A Puck/Cone combination was placed at the rear left under the power supply, at the middle front under the transport and at the rear right.

    Placing the SACD player on its own feet on the PowerBase resulted in diminished sound quality. The combination of Black Diamond Racing cones and pucks on top of the PowerBase resulted in improved sound over using the cones and pucks alone.

    I found the PowerBase to be very sensitive to power cords. As I went up in power cord quality, on both the incoming and outgoing sides, better sound quality resulted. For the SACD player, I have a Premier SC power cord between the P10 AC regenerator and another Premier SC between the PowerBase and the SACD player. The power chain is as follows:

    1. Dedicated 20 amp AC circuit.
    2. PS Audio Soloist Premier SE in-wall conditioner.
    3. PS Audio AC-12 power cord.
    4. PS Audio P10 AC regenerator.
    5. PS Audio Premier SC power cords from P10 to source components and preamplifiers.

    Each Parasound JC 1 monoblock power amp is on a dedicated 20 amp AC circuit terminated by a PS Audio Soloist SC and AC-12 power cord. The P10 and all other electronics have HiFi Tuning Supreme power line fuses.

    The Teres Audio Model 255 turntable rested on three Black Diamond Racing Large Puck/Mark 4 Cone combinations. The cones came as standard equipment with the turntable. I thought (hoped) I might be able to get away with using the PowerBase only as an isolation platform. Running the turntable motor power supply from the PowerBase resulted further improvements (image weight, increased space between images, more articulate bass) over just running the power supply from the P10. A Premier SC power cord ran from the P10 to the PowerBase and a Statement SC power cord ran from the PowerBase to the turntable motor power supply. I only ordered one PowerBase for this trial, but I am going to order another one for the turntable (when they go on sale again ;) ).

    After initial listening trials are completed, I will condition one of the PowerBase's outlets for 168 hours, and the additional power cord for 100 hours on my Audiodharma Cable Cooker. That will be followed by another round of listening trials. One hundred hours on the Cooker is roughly equal to 300 hours of actual use. One hundred-sixty eight hours on the Cooker is roughly equal to 500 hours of actual use.

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    Figure 1. Two channel audio system. The equipment cabinet is a Salamander Synergy Triple 30. The floor is hardwood glued to concrete slab.

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    Figure 2. Two channel audio system electronics.

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    Figure 3. Cary Audio CD 306 Pro Version CD/SACD player on PowerBase. This did not work.

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    Figure 4. Cary Audio CD 306 Pro Version CD/SACD player on PowerBase and Black Diamond Racing cones and pucks. This combination was outstanding.

    I am going to let the PowerBase's clear plastic protective cover remain in place for two reasons:

    1. If I want to sell the unit in the future the top will look like new.

    2. The plastic cover forms a tight vacuum seal with the smooth bottom of the pucks, tightly integrating the pucks and the PowerBase top. I had to use a hammer to gently knock off one of the pucks.

    I will neatly trim the excess plastic around the edges.

    image
    Figure 5. Teres Audio Model 255 turntable on PowerBase. I needed to raise the motor 1 inch. A 5" x 5" x 1.25" marble sample worked perfectly. The rough side provided excellent grip for the motor's feet. If I find that using the BDR pucks between the turntable and PowerBase provides additional improvement, I will need to raise the motor an additional 1.5 inches.

    image
    Figure 6. A variety of power cords were used. Clockwise from bottom: Signal Cable MagicPower
    ($59, 3 ft., 10 AWG), Signal Cable Digital Reference ($124, 6 ft., 12 AWG), PS Audio Statement SC
    ($659, 2m, 8 AWG), Volex 14 ($50, 6 ft., 14 AWG), PS Audio Premier SC ($1793, 2m, 7 AWG).


    image
    Figure 7. Oscilloscope Fast Fourier Transform plot of the power signal noise spectrum out of the Premier SC power cord connected to the P10.

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    Figure 8. Oscilloscope Fast Fourier Transform plot of the power signal noise spectrum out of the PowerBase connected to the P10. The noise is lower in density and amplitude around 60 Hz (large spike). ;)

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    Figure 9. The included 8.5" 14 AWG power cord was way too short...on both length and sound.

    Associated Equipment

    Pass Labs X0.2 Line Level Preamplifiers
    Pass Labs XP-25 Phono Preamplifiers
    Parasound Halo JC 1 Monoblock Power Amplifiers
    Teres Audio Model 255 Turntable with Reference II Motor
    Graham Phantom B-44 Tonearm
    Ortofon MC Windfeld Phono Cartridge
    Cary Audio CD 306 Professional Version CD/SACD Player
    PS Audio P10 AC Regenerator
    Polk Audio SDA SRS 1.2TL Loudspeakers (Hotrodded)
    PS Audio AC-12 Power Cords for P10 and Power Amplifiers
    PS Audio Premier SC Power Cords for Source Components and Preamplifiers
    AudioQuest Sky XLR Interconnects
    AudioQuest Everest Speaker Cables
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    Thanked by 1darek
  • 49 Comments
  • Vote Up0Vote Down sgrowansgrowan
    Posts: 869Community Leader, Beta Tester
    Your system looks great. Glad you like the Powerbases with the BDRC. I did not want to hear that one needs to use additional tuning gizmos with the Powerbase as that is one of the main pouts of using one. I'll have to revisit mine with powercords as well.
    "If people reach perfection, they vanish you know. " -T.H. White
    From- The Once and Future King
  • Vote Up0Vote Down gordonGordon
    Posts: 6,045PS Expert
    I found little sonic difference with PC AFTER the PB outlets.
    PB, in my case fed by Shunyata Anaconda from the P10.
    I tried the PB on/off my GP Audio shelf and did prefer ON.
    I also was afraid to get into cones and webbed feet as I am trying to simplify, BUT I will play around a bit on the weekend. It does make sense that this would change the sound. Then it would be up to personal preference and systems.
    I guess this never ends. Whoopie! ;))

    Nice clean set-up, by the way.
    I'm still in a mess with mine.
    "The fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science." - Einstein
    “The world as we have created it is a process of our thinking. It cannot be changed without changing our thinking.”
    ― Albert Einstein
    "Who tastes not, knows not."
    - my Mom
  • Vote Up0Vote Down wglennwglenn
    Posts: 1,325Member
    Nice system! I'm waiting on my PB with much anticipation because I have a very shaky floor and my attempts at homemade isolation have not been detectable (to my ears). Looking at the first photo gives me a sick thought- I wonder if putting PBs under speakers would yield any results, particularly if one has relatively "mobile" floors? I suspect most of us don't have that many PBs to spare.
    "Though great ideas command the attention of the people, their source and validity shall remain suspect when their origin is of the internet." -Abraham Lincoln
  • Vote Up0Vote Down elkElk
    Posts: 4,389Community Leader, Beta Tester
    Great write up and interesting.
  • wglenn said:

    Nice system! I'm waiting on my PB with much anticipation because I have a very shaky floor and my attempts at homemade isolation have not been detectable (to my ears). Looking at the first photo gives me a sick thought- I wonder if putting PBs under speakers would yield any results, particularly if one has relatively "mobile" floors? I suspect most of us don't have that many PBs to spare.



    Ideally, you want to couple your speakers to the floor rather than isolate them. Of course, this assumes your floors are stable. If you cannot do anything about the floor, look into adding a high mass platform under each speaker.

  • Vote Up0Vote Down wglennwglenn
    Posts: 1,325Member
    Yes, I've always been in this camp with spikes and mass both. Some disagree and prefer the isolation route and I, too, wonder if there would be an advantage with a shaky floor.
    "Though great ideas command the attention of the people, their source and validity shall remain suspect when their origin is of the internet." -Abraham Lincoln
  • Very nice looking system! I like the orange thing. Either cool art or a great sound diffuser - maybe both! Please keep us posted on the BDR experimentation. I had BDR cones and some "Those Things" in my system but hoped that my three PBs would relegate them to my secondary system. Since part of the function, as I understand it, is for the PBs to "mask" vibration that cannot be eliminated in a fashion I believe Paul compared to "dithering," my thoughts are that perhaps the BDR cones would be more effective pointing up, rather then the traditional down. Have you tried this?
  • socal77 said:

    Since part of the function, as I understand it, is for the PBs to "mask" vibration that cannot be eliminated in a fashion I believe Paul compared to "dithering," my thoughts are that perhaps the BDR cones would be more effective pointing up, rather then the traditional down. Have you tried this?



    I tried cones pointing up and down on the P10 and the SACD player. Down sounded best. With the P10, I tried aluminum and BDR cones. Aluminum sounded best.

  • I am not a big fan of cones as they focus specific energy into the equipment, something I am not a big fan of.

    Great FFT's - that was really interesting.
    Paul McGowan CEO PS Audio
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  • PowerBase Break In

    The PowerBase manual does not recommend a specific number of hours of break in. It only says wait a week before doing critical listening. Since 2009, I have been using an Audiodharma Cable Cooker to accelerate audio component break in. The rule of thumb is 1 hour on the Cooker is roughly equal to 3 hours of actual use. The recommended break in time for the Soloist Premier SE was 200 to 500 hours, depending on who at PS Audio answered your phone call or email. I'll do the 500 hour equivalent (168 hours (7 days) on the Cooker). PS Audio has been consistent in their recommendation of 300 hours of break in for power cables. The 2m Premier SC power cable that will go between the PowerBase and my turntable motor power supply with be conditioned on the Cooker for 100 hours (4 days - 4 hours), which is roughly equal to 300 hours of use.

    For power and speaker cables, the Cable Cooker uses a 12 volt, 1.88 amp (22 watts rms) conditioning signal that consists of a sweeping square wave (0 to 40 kHz). For interconnects, the Cooker uses a 12 volt 120 mA (1.44 watts rms).

    image
    Figure 10. I made a Y-adapter so that I could pull current through both outlets of a duplex receptacle. However, break in takes twice as long because the current is split between receptacles.

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    Figure 11. Since only one component will be used with this PowerBase, there was no need to break in both outlets because only one component (the turntable motor) will be plugged in.

    Another PowerBase will be acquired for the SACD player. I was fortunate enough to track down and purchase a 1m Premier SC power cord to go between the future PowerBase and SACD player. I would like to try a PowerBase under my P10, but, as can be seen in figure 2 of the first post, I do not have room to accommodate the 2.75" height of the PowerBase and still provide adequate air circulation space above the P10 and other components above it. The P10 did benefit from three aluminum cones, as noted in this report:

    http://www.polkaudio.com/forums/showthread.php?126544-Studies-On-Residential-Power-Line-Noise-Part-10-PS-Audio-P10-AC-Regenerator

    image
    Figure 12. Two of three Soloist Premier SE in-wall conditioners behind the two channel equipment cabinet and a Power Port Premier below them.

    One might think that, since duplex receptacles have both outlets wired in parallel, there is no need to break in both outlets. You need to pull current through each outlet. The plastic body surrounding the blade receptacles in each outlet has dielectric properties and it requires conditioning to reduce the effects of absorption and spurious release of energy from and to the power signal. Figure 12 shows two Soloist Premier SE in-wall conditioners, each with a Power Port Premier receptacle. Another Power Port Premier receptacle replaced the ordinary receptacle at the lower right. In each of the three receptacles in figure 12, the lower outlet is broken in and the upper outlet is not. The difference between the broken in and unbroken in outlet of each receptacle is easily heard, as is the difference between the Soloist SE and the "naked" Power Port Premier installed in the wall.
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  • Vote Up0Vote Down gordonGordon
    Posts: 6,045PS Expert
    i too have been using one port on the PB and I took my PWD?PB to a friends place to hear some new equipment he is having made for him in Russia. Also was a good time to compare to his Benchmark DAC2.
    When I came home I plugged into the previously unused port and did notice a big difference.
    Much thinner sound, almost like I had a bad midrange driver.
    I'll leave it in for a couple of days to see if it catches up.
    "The fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science." - Einstein
    “The world as we have created it is a process of our thinking. It cannot be changed without changing our thinking.”
    ― Albert Einstein
    "Who tastes not, knows not."
    - my Mom
  • Turntable PowerBase After Break In

    I had planned to break in the PowerBase and it's Premier SC power cord for seven straight days on the Audiodharma Cable Cooker, but I stopped seeing improvements in the noise spectrum (FFT) measurements after the third day (72 hours straight). I also noticed that the Cable Cooker's signal amplitude from the PowerBase had risen from 11.8 to 12 volts. The Cooker's nominal output is 12 volts, but my unit puts out 13 volts. I reinstalled the PowerBase after the 114th hour (4.75 days) and there was the slightly veiled sound that was evidence of overcooking. A lot of the veiling went away after 2 hours of music play. The veiling was completely gone after letting the PowerBase and Premier SC power cord "rest" for 20 hours. It appears that 3 days (72 hours) of Cable Cooker processing was enough. This was approximately equivalent to 216 hours of break in with music play.

    Comparing my pre and post break in listening notes, there were new instrumental details, heavier image weight, particularly with vocals, and more bass detail and articulation. I did not note any improvements in spatial rendering. I primarily listen to instrumental jazz.

    image
    Figure 13. Fast Fourier Transform plot of PowerBase power signal pre-break in.

    image
    Figure 14. Fast Fourier Transform plot of PowerBase power signal post-break in.

    It is easier to see the differences in the FFT plots in figures 13 and 14 by saving them and viewing in succession. These plots were taken with the PowerBase connected to a P10 AC regenerator by a Premier SC power cord. The P10 measured incoming THD of 1.5% and outgoing THD of 0.2% on the pre and post break in measurement days. The post-break in FFT shows a flatter and less dense noise spectrum overall, particularly around 60 Hz.

    image
    Figure 15. Locating the motor pod off the PowerBase presented some problems.

    I use a twist-on reflex record clamp. Often, when I would twist off the clamp, the PowerBase top would tilt just enough to cause the belt to loose tension and slip down a bit on either the motor pulley or the platter or both. The issue was resolved by placing the motor pod on the PowerBase and behind the tonearm. This required reinstalling the Black Diamond Racing pucks. This turned out to be serendipitous because the BDR/PowerBase combination sounded better than the PowerBase alone.

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    Figure 16. Placing the motor pod on the PowerBase and behind the tonearm resolved belt tension issues.

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    Figure 17. Strain relief for the PowerBase's heavy Premier SC power cords is provided by stiff foam blocks.

    image
    Figure 18. You look and sound beautiful, but I wish I knew how to quit you. Turntables are so aggravating and inconvenient. The Teres Audio Model 255 turntable weighs 60 pounds. The Reference II motor weighs 6.5 pounds.

    image
    Figure 19. I had initially planned to keep the protective vinyl film on the PowerBase's top and just trim off the excess around the edges. I changed my mind after taking a long peek under the film.

    Thin felt pads, cut from sheet fabric, cover the entire bottom of the BDR pucks, as well as the bottom of the motor pod. This prevents marring of the PowerBase's gloss black surface. I tried thin vinyl bumper pads under the pucks, but that resulted in a loss of image definition and blurred bass. The felt did not change the sound.

    Further Study

    The newly arrived second PowerBase, which will be used with my SACD player, will be processed on the Cable Cooker for 72 hours straight.

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    Figure 20. The second PowerBase and 1m Premier SC power cord for my SACD player are here!

    What? You thought the PowerBase was going to let you move away from needing those big, thick, heavy gauge power cords? Guess what? No. I also thought I was going to ditch my BDR cones and pucks, but again...no.

    The PowerBase has proven to be an excellent compliment to the mechanical noise and electrical noise abatement measures I already had in place.

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    Figure 21. Getting some preliminary listening in with the SACD player's PowerBase before it undergoes break in conditioning with the Cable Cooker.
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  • Fantastic info, darqueknight. Really great posts. B-)
  • Vote Up0Vote Down elkElk
    Posts: 4,389Community Leader, Beta Tester
    A giant +1!

    The foam blocks as strain relief is a simple, clever idea.
  • Vote Up0Vote Down wglennwglenn
    Posts: 1,325Member
    Once again, great job. Your description of the sound changes are very similar to what I am experiencing with the PB under the PWD. I'm not going to say much until mine has broken in.
    "Though great ideas command the attention of the people, their source and validity shall remain suspect when their origin is of the internet." -Abraham Lincoln
  • Vote Up0Vote Down elkElk
    Posts: 4,389Community Leader, Beta Tester
    This thread keeps reminding me I need to break my BDR cones out of storage and give them a try on the PowerBase.
  • Power Signal Noise Spectrum Measurements

    The power signal output was measured with a Tektronix TDS 2012 oscilloscope using the Fast Fourier Transform function. The first eight plots are with power supplied from the wall. The last two plots are with power supplied from a PS Audio P10 AC regenerator.

    In the power from wall plots, the DC component (0 Hz), major harmonics (3rd, 5th, and 7th) and power company signalling tones are very prominent. The PowerBase was evaluated with a variety of power cords as shown in figures 22 and 23.

    image
    Figure 22. Clockwise from bottom: Signal Cable MagicPower ($59, 3 ft., 10 AWG), Signal Cable Digital Reference ($124, 6 ft., 12 AWG), PS Audio Statement SC ($659, 2m, 8 AWG), Volex 14 ($50, 6 ft., 14 AWG), PS Audio Premier SC ($1793, 2m, 7 AWG).

    image
    Figure 23. The PowerBase's stock 8.5" 14 AWG power cord.

    In the figures below, the largest spike is the 60 Hz power signal. Everything else, for audio and video purposes, is undesirable noise. Each vertical dot represents 2 dB of amplitude. Each horizontal dot represents 10 Hz of frequency.

    The voltage level of the fundamental 60 Hz power signal, its harmonics and other power spectrum components is calculated this way: The vertical axis does not start at 0 dB. It starts at a reference magnitude of -27 db (0.044 volts) The fundamental 60 Hz spike has a magnitude of 68.7 dB, therefore -27 dB + 68.7 dB = 41.7 dB, which is the absolute (real) magnitude of the fundamental 60 Hz frequency. A reference voltage of 1 volt rms (Vo) is assumed. The rms voltage (voltage coming out of the wall) is calculated by the equation Vrms=Vo x 10^(dB/20). For the 60 Hz power signal in figure 24,

    Vrms = 1 x 10^(41.7/20) = 121.6 volts.

    In addition to the contaminating effects of the power signal's DC component and odd order harmonics, which are a result of the way electric power is generated, there are also power company test and control tones at 10 Hz, 350 Hz and 470 Hz. These tones are used by the power company to remotely interact with power meters and other equipment on the power grid. Finally, there is background noise due to the wire and equipment on the power grid, and in the oscilloscope itself.

    The following measurements were taken prior to breaking in the PowerBase. None of the power cords were broken in. The power line THD was 1.5%. All measurements were taken within a few minutes of each other.

    It is easier to see differences in the FFT plots if they are saved and viewed in succession.

    image
    Figure 24. FFT of power signal from ordinary household outlet.

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    Figure 25. FFT of power signal from a Signal Cable MagicPower power cord connected to the wall.

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    Figure 26. FFT of power signal from PowerBase fed from the wall through a Signal Cable MagicPower power cord.

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    Figure 27. FFT of power signal from PowerBase stock power cord connected to a PowerBase outlet with PowerBase fed from the wall through a MagicPower power cord.

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    Figure 28. FFT of power signal from PowerBase stock power cord connected to a PowerBase outlet with PowerBase fed from the wall through a Premier SC power cord.

    image
    Figure 29. FFT of power signal from Signal Cable MagicPower power cord connected to a PowerBase outlet with PowerBase fed from the wall through a Premier SC power cord.

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    Figure 30. FFT of power signal from a Signal Cable Digital Reference power cord connected to a PowerBase outlet with PowerBase fed from the wall through a Premier SC power cord.

    image
    Figure 31. FFT of power signal from a Statement SC power cord connected to a PowerBase outlet with PowerBase fed from the wall through a Premier SC power cord.

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    Figure 32. FFT of power signal from a Premier SC power cord connected to a PS Audio P10 AC regenerator.

    image
    Figure 33. FFT of power signal from a PowerBase outlet with PowerBase connected to a PS Audio P10 AC regenerator with a Premier SC power cord.


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  • Vote Up0Vote Down elkElk
    Posts: 4,389Community Leader, Beta Tester
    darqueknight said: there are also power company test and control tones at 10 Hz, 350 Hz and 470 Hz.

    I did not know this. Interesting.

    How repeatable are the FFT measurements? For example, do you get essentially the same results an hour later, the next day? I am just curious as to the degree to which we can fairly compare the measurements.

    Thank you again for your efforts. This is great fun.

  • The repeatability of these type of measurements depends on how stable the power at your location is. Before the local power company upgraded its transmission facilities several years ago, there would be significant variation in power quality between day and night and between weekday and weekend, but the power quality was fairly consistent from one hour on a particular work day to the corresponding hours on subsequent work days. The same was true for weekend days. My power line voltage is fairly steady in the range of 120-122 volts with a THD in the range of 1.5%. Before power company facility upgrades, daytime THD was in the area of 2.4% and late nighttime THD was in the area of 1.6 - 2.1%. Voltage would be in the area of 118-121 volts in the daytime and 122-125 volts at night.

    The ten measurements shown in the previous post were taken within minutes of each other.
  • Vote Up0Vote Down elkElk
    Posts: 4,389Community Leader, Beta Tester
    Given the proximity of the tests it appears completely fair to comparer them directly.

    Thanks for the info.
  • Vote Up0Vote Down wglennwglenn
    Posts: 1,325Member
    Wow. Thank you. If you have any other AC line info that you would like to share I'm all ears.
    "Though great ideas command the attention of the people, their source and validity shall remain suspect when their origin is of the internet." -Abraham Lincoln
  • Vote Up0Vote Down alekzAlekz
    Posts: 2,776Community Leader, Beta Tester
    Elk said: The foam blocks as strain relief is a simple, clever idea.

    Yes, was just going to say that. (I know what I going to do on Sunday...)
  • Residential Power Quality

    These screen shots from my four AC regenerators were taken this morning beginning at 7am. The two channel audio system has all the source components and preamps behind a P10. The home theater system has the plasma TV and Tivo on a P5. Also in the home theater system are three power amps, two preamps and a Blu-ray player on a P10. The entire master bedroom A/V system (plasma TV, preamp, power amp, Blu-ray player and subwoofer) are on a Power Plant Premier.

    image
    Figure 34. Two channel stereo system P10 status.

    image
    Figure 35. Home theater P5 status.

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    Figure 36. Home theater P10 status.

    image
    Figure 37. Master bedroom PPP incoming THD.

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    Figure 38. Master bedroom PPP outgoing THD.

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    Figure 39. Master bedroom PPP incoming voltage.

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    Figure 40. Master bedroom PPP outgoing voltage.
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  • Vote Up0Vote Down maniacmaniac
    Posts: 688Member, Beta Tester
    Hmm I am bit curious why the output voltage is not 120V exactly? I am asking as I have P5 and also can see that although I set output to let's say 230V (EU), i'm getting 228,229,230 or 231V on output.

    BTW when I was using latest P5 firmware and Low Distortion mode the P5 was producing nearly 240V outgoing voltage even when I tried to set it to 230 or less. Due to this I had to rollback to older firmware I have saved before the update.. I was not measuring it by voltmeter, just relying on the P5 readings on the display. Anyone else had such issue?
    With current firmware there is bug showing higher THD out when I turn on MultiWave (i have it enabled all the time), but this should be only cosmetic issue if my understanding is correct.
    |Qnap&HTPC - P5 - PWD2&Bridge - Electrocompaniet EC4.8 - AW400 - Dynaudio S3.4|SBTouch|Burson Conductor - SAA Endorphine - HD800|Project XpressionIII + Ortofon Blue - ECP1|XLO&Supra|
    Thanked by 1sgrowan
  • Vote Up0Vote Down elkElk
    Posts: 4,389Community Leader, Beta Tester
    maniac said: I am bit curious why the output voltage is not 120V exactly?

    My assumption as I was looking at the screens is that he chose 121V and I planned to ask why. So, if this is the case, why?
  • The greater the difference between the incoming and outgoing voltage, the harder the regenerator has to work. My home's line voltage is typically around 122 volts. My P5, P10's and PPP output is about 1 volt higher than what their meters show. I set all of my regenerator outputs at 121 in order to get 122 volts out.

    For example I just took these measurements:

    1. My PPP is set for 121 volts out, but a voltmeter at one of its outlets read 121.8 volts. The voltmeter at the wall outlet read 122.5 volts. The PPP's incoming and outgoing voltage meter showed 121 volts for each.

    2. The P10 in my home theater system is set for 121 volts out, but a voltmeter at one of its outlets read 121.9 volts. The voltmeter at the wall outlet read 122.6 volts. The P10's status screen showed 122.6 volts incoming and 120.9 volts outgoing.

  • Vote Up0Vote Down elkElk
    Posts: 4,389Community Leader, Beta Tester
    Makes perfect sense.
  • There is a procedure for calibrating the PPP's voltmeter to accurately show the actual incoming and outgoing voltage, but the meter goes out of adjustment over time. It is easier for me to just set the outgoing voltage close to the line voltage and leave it alone. The PPP's meter calibration procedure was not given in the manual, but PS Audio would provide it upon request.

    I don't know if the P3/P5/P10 meters can be calibrated by the user.
  • Vote Up0Vote Down alekzAlekz
    Posts: 2,776Community Leader, Beta Tester
    maniac said: when I turn on MultiWave


    BTW, do you hear any difference? I do not (but I have a PPP)
  • Vote Up0Vote Down elkElk
    Posts: 4,389Community Leader, Beta Tester
    darqueknight said: There is a procedure for calibrating the PPP's voltmeter to accurately show the actual incoming and outgoing voltage

    Yes. I have done it and it is quite easy. I agree it is not worth worrying about.