October, 2017



 

DirectStream Memory Player and DirectStream DAC

Product of the year

TONEAudio Magazine has just awarded our DirectStream Memory Player and DAC combo as digital product of the year! We’re bursting our buttons with pride.

Publisher Jeff Dorgay wrote a wonderful review of the pair, called Takin’ on the big boys. His closing paragraph pretty much sums up his feeling on the matter.

Much as I love analog, and think streaming TIDAL is super cool, there are times that I don’t want to be a suspension mechanic or an IT guy. That’s when putting a shiny disc in the drawer and just pressing play is a lovely thing. Unless you’re going to drop six figures on a dCS Vivaldi or an Esoteric Grandioso, I can’t think of a better digital disc player than the PS Audio DirectStream Memory Player and DAC. (Neither of these six figure players will play your DVD-a discs) If I had more than two thumbs to raise I would offer them, it’s that good. The only remaining choice is whether you want silver or black.

What Jeff and others have discovered is that good old CDs (you remember them, right?) sound better than most ever imagined, but only if played through the proper gear. DMP and DS bring out not-so-subtle nuances locked away in the CD (and SACD) that you’ve likely never known were there.

This is one hell of a stack of equipment and we’re proud it made product of the year.

To celebrate, we’ve put the two together as a pair and made them quite attractive to acquire. And, remember, you can trade up your existing gear too!



Is vinyl still important?

Ever since I started answering your questions on Ask Paul the topics have come at me fast and furious. And, that’s great! Bring them on. One of the most poignant questions I’ve been asked is the question of vinyl. Is it still a viable medium given digital audio’s better specs, dynamics, frequency extremes, and noise levels?

In fact, yes. I started my journey into the high-end audio sphere some 45 years ago and back then there was nothing but vinyl. And I was in heaven listening to music scraped by a needle through plastic grooves. Why would that pleasure level change? Sure, I was thrilled once the promise of digital audio started getting fulfilled (and that took forever), but that never diminished the sheer joy of the vinyl experience.

In fact, the actual question came down to an interesting one. Does vinyl have a soul?

Click here to read the entire story.

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Are sonic differences real?

We all hear changes when we swap cables, add tweaks like footers, lifts, dots, and so on. But are they real? Of course, some are and some… watch my video on the subject to learn more. And coming up on Ask Paul, “are audiophiles mentally stable?” Stay tuned to Paul’s Post to find out the answer.

Real or imagined?
 

Copper Magazine

We’ve heard a lot about anniversaries in 2017, with it being the 50th anniversary of Sgt. Pepper, the Summer of Love, the Stones’ Their Satanic Majesties Request, and much more. One anniversary that’s received zero attention is the 60th anniversary of the first single-groove Stereo LP, manufactured by Audio Fidelity in October of 1957.

Want to read more? Jump over to Copper Magazine.

Copper is cost-free, ad-free, and committed to great articles without an attitude.

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RMAF show coverage

The month of October in Colorado means fall weather and the Rocky Mountain Audio Fest! PS Audio wasn’t shy this year, we grabbed a decent sized room on the first floor and showed off the new P20 Power Plants, played music through Focal speakers and REL subwoofers, and had a grand old time.

I shot some footage of the event you might enjoy. In this video, we meet Jeff Rowland and get a personalized tour of his room and equipment. We say hi to Richard Vandersteen, Luke Manley, Ted Smith, and Sandy Gross.

Watch the video

 

The return of liner notes?

Two decades into the era of online music, streaming has been hailed as the industry’s savior, but a complaint from the earliest days of digital services persists: What happened to the liner notes?

Much of the material that once accompanied an album has long since been stripped away — not just the lyrics and thank-you lists, but also essays, artwork and even basic details like songwriting credits — leaving listeners with little more on their screens to look at but a song title and a postage-stamp-size cover image.

One company, TunesMap, wants to return much of that lost information, and more, through an interactive display that, when cued by a song playing on a streaming service, will present a feed of videos, photographs and links to related material.

Read the article